This Week in Books (5th January, 2022)

Hosted by Lipsy Lost and Found, my Wednesday post gives you a taste of what I’m reading this week. A similar meme is run by Taking on a World of Words.

| LAST BOOK I FINISHED READING |

A Christmas Carol is the most famous, heart-warming and chilling festive story of them all. In these pages we meet Ebenezer Scrooge, whose name is synonymous with greed and parsimony: ‘Every idiot who goes about with “Merry Christmas” on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart’. This attitude is soon challenged when the ghost of his old partner, Jacob Marley, returns from the grave to haunt him on Christmas Eve. Scrooge is then visited in turn by three spirits of Christmas Past, Present and Future, each one revealing the error of his ways and gradually melting the frozen heart of this old miser, leading him towards his redemption. On the journey we take with Scrooge we encounter a rich array of Dickensian characters including the poor Cratchit family with the ailing Tiny Tim and the generous and jolly Fezziwig.

[My annual re-read of this classic. Even if I started it when Christmas was already over. It’s just how I roll 💁🏼‍♀️]

| THE BOOK I’M CURRENTLY READING |

Laura has spent most of her life being judged. She’s seen as hot-tempered, troubled, a loner. Some even call her dangerous. 

Miriam knows that just because Laura is witnessed leaving the scene of a horrific murder with blood on her clothes, that doesn’t mean she’s a killer. Bitter experience has taught her how easy it is to get caught in the wrong place at the wrong time. 

Carla is reeling from the brutal murder of her nephew. She trusts no one: good people are capable of terrible deeds. But how far will she go to find peace? Innocent or guilty, everyone is damaged. Some are damaged enough to kill. 

[I’m only about thirty pages in so nothing much to report yet. I’m very surprised to see the rather low rating on Goodreads though since I saw nothing but raving early reviews. I guess we will see where I land.]

| ALSO READING CURRENTLY |

In The Whistler, Lacy Stoltz investigated a corrupt judge who was taking millions in bribes from a crime syndicate. She put the criminals away, but only after being attacked and nearly killed. Three years later, and approaching forty, she is tired of her work for the Florida Board on Judicial Conduct and ready for a change.

Then she meets a mysterious woman who is so frightened she uses a number of aliases. Jeri Crosby’s father was murdered twenty years earlier in a case that remains unsolved and that has grown stone cold. But Jeri has a suspect whom she has become obsessed with and has stalked for two decades. Along the way, she has discovered other victims.

Suspicions are easy enough, but proof seems impossible. The man is brilliant, patient, and always one step ahead of law enforcement. He is the most cunning of all serial killers. He knows forensics, police procedure, and most important: he knows the law.

He is a judge, in Florida—under Lacy’s jurisdiction.

He has a list, with the names of his victims and targets, all unsuspecting people unlucky enough to have crossed his path and wronged him in some way. How can Lacy pursue him, without becoming the next name on his list?

[I started this book on November 6th and still have a little over a 100 pages to go. That should tell you how well my reading has been going these last few months 😂. Or is it Grisham’s fault? Because The Judge’s List is …. okay? But not exactly blowing me away.]

| WHAT I’M (PROBABLY) READING NEXT |

It’s time to solve the murder of the century…

Forty years ago, Steven Smith found a copy of a famous children’s book, its margins full of strange markings and annotations. He took it to his remedial English teacher, Miss Isles, who became convinced it was the key to solving a puzzle. That a message in secret code ran through all Edith Twyford’s novels. Then Miss Isles disappeared on a class field trip, and Steven’s memory won’t allow him to remember what happened.

Now, out of prison after a long stretch, Steven decides to investigate the mystery that has haunted him for decades. Was Miss Isles murdered? Was she deluded? Or was she right about the code? And is it still in use today? Desperate to recover his memories and find out what really happened to Miss Isles, Steven revisits the people and places of his childhood. But it soon becomes clear that Edith Twyford wasn’t just a writer of forgotten children’s stories. The Twyford Code has great power, and he isn’t the only one trying to solve it.

[I have rather huge expectations about this one after reading The Appeal, which made my top 10 last year.]


Right, let’s see if this will get me back into the swing of things.

What are you reading this week? Do let me know. I need ideas on what to shop for. Haven’t bought a book since last year 😉. Happy reading! xx

  7 comments for “This Week in Books (5th January, 2022)

  1. January 5, 2022 at 10:55 am

    Can’t wait to see what you think of a Slow Fire Burning. I loved the audiobook and think it’s one of my favourite thrillers from last year. xx

    Liked by 1 person

  2. January 5, 2022 at 9:58 pm

    Nice lineup, Eva💜

    Like

  3. January 6, 2022 at 2:55 pm

    I thoroughly enjoyed A Slow Fire Burning – I hope you do too!

    Liked by 1 person

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