Sister by Kjell Ola Dahl | @ko_dahl @OrendaBooks @annecater | #excerpt #extract #RandomThingsTours

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for Sister by Kjell Ola Dahl! Thanks to Anne Cater at Random Things Tours for the invitation to join. Today, I have an extract to share with you all but first, let’s see what Sister is all about.

Author : Kjell Ola Dahl
Title : Sister
Series : Oslo Detectives #9
Pages : 276
Publisher : Orenda Books
Publication date : April 30, 2020

| ABOUT THE BOOK |

Suspended from duty, Detective Frølich is working as a private investigator, when his girlfriend’s colleague asks for his help with a female asylum seeker, who the authorities are about to deport. She claims to have a sister in Norway, and fears that returning to her home country will mean instant death.

Frølich quickly discovers the whereabouts of the young woman’s sister, but things become increasingly complex when she denies having a sibling, and Frølich is threatened off the case by the police. As the body count rises, it becomes clear that the answers lie in an old investigation, and the mysterious sister, who is now on the run…

| EXTRACT |

Matilde said she had met Guri for the first time after a gig at the Down on the Farm festival in Halden four years before. They had been travelling on the same train home when it hit an elk, which affected the electricity supply and left them stuck between two stations. It had been the last train that day, so NSB had organised buses instead. She and Guri had struck up a conversation as they stood waiting for a bus that showed no signs of ever appearing. Then Guri had rung her brother and he had come to drive them home. Afterwards they had often been together. Guri was a trained psychiatric nurse. She was crazy about everything to do with horses and had long had her own horse stabled on a farm not far from Svinndal. There she used to practise showjumping. But the previous winter the horse had baulked at a fence. Guri had dug in her heels, but this startled the stallion; it kicked out its rear legs, or something like that, and Guri fell off. 

‘An Arab. It must’ve been on edge.’ 

Guri had fallen badly. Fortunately she had been wearing a helmet, but it didn’t protect her back. So, no more show jumping for a good while. However, the prognosis was better than expected. She had retrained her body by paddling a kayak. 

As they approached Spydeberg they turned off the main road and continued towards Lyseren. Matilde drove right down to a grassy slope, which must have been a kind of beach, and parked beneath a huge pine tree. She texted a message and received an answer at once. They strolled down to the water’s edge to wait. 

Frank sat down on a stump and gazed across as Matilde took off her sandals, folded up her trousers and waded in. A swarm of midges danced above her head; they looked like a little cloud. 

After a while a kayak approached at great speed. The sun glinted on the paddle blades with every stroke that Guri took. The kayak glided up onto the grass, then she lifted herself out: a lithe woman in her thirties, wearing a wetsuit down to mid-thigh, long, blonde hair in a plait over her shoulder. 

She and Matilde hugged. 

Afterwards she turned to him: a face with limpid blue eyes and a narrow, slightly crooked nose above attractive but vulnerable lips that made her seem shy when she smiled. Like now, as they exchanged looks, a ‘hi’ and a handshake.

Guri told him that the refugee centre where she worked had what they called a ‘dedicated area’ for asylum seekers with psychological or other illnesses requiring special treatment. This was where she met the girl who was searching for her sister. 

‘She’s in a bad way,’ Guri said. ‘The doctors can’t agree on whether this is post-traumatic stress syndrome or a deeper psychological issue. But she’s had an awful time. She’s fled from war and abuse into more abuse here in the west.

And now they’ve decided she has to leave again. They’re kicking her out on her arse. The bloody government. It’s so cynical. She can barely look after herself, but out she goes. She has one last hope: her sister, who travelled the same road a few years ago. Her sister came here, to Norway. But no one has a clue where she’s living or what she’s doing. Now Aisha’s stuck in the refugee centre and desperately needs to be reunited with her sister while the police just can’t wait to fly her to Turkey. She’ll never stand it. If she’s sent to Istanbul she’ll die or take her own life, I’m sure of that.’ 

Guri’s kayak must have been very light because she carried it under her arm, to a red Volvo estate parked under the trees, and hoisted it onto the roof. She took a couple of rollers with straps from the car and attached the kayak firmly, with sharp yanks, glanced across at Frølich and said: ‘Turn around.’ 

He didn’t understand what she meant. ‘I’m going to change my clothes,’ she said. He wandered down to the water as the women sorted out Guri’s outfit. On his return Guri was wearing a flowery top, light-blue jeans and sandals. 

They got into their cars. Guri led the way while they followed in the convertible. Guri’s Volvo had only one rear light working.

If you’d like to read more, Sister is available to buy in ebook format. The UK paperback will be published on April 30th.

Affiliate link : Bookdepository
Other retailers : Amazon US | Amazon UK | Hive UK | Kobo | Waterstones

| ABOUT THE AUTHOR |

One of the fathers of the Nordic Noir genre, Kjell Ola Dahl was born in 1958 in Gjøvik. He made his debut in 1993, and has since published eleven novels, the most prominent of which is a series of police procedurals cum psychological thrillers featuring investigators Gunnarstranda and Frølich. In 2000 he won the Riverton Prize for The Last Fix and he won both the prestigious Brage and Riverton Prizes for The Courier in 2015. His work has been published in 14 countries, and he lives in Oslo.

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